AD

Home

About SAARC Tour

Send Your Tour Experience

Feedback

SAARC Tour Booking

SAARC Information

Contact Us

 
India info
India Picture Gallery
Famous city of India
Travel to India
India Tours Company
India Hotel/ Motel/ Guest House
India Map
India Fairs and Festivals
India Tour Booking
India History
Map of India
Animals of India
India Religion
Culture of India
India Music
India Food
Shopping in India
India Transportation
India Visa
Distance Chart
India Tour Articles in Bengali
India Accommodation Directory
India Air-Rail-Bus Connectivity
India Heritage Area
Agra Fort
Ajanta Caves
Bodhgaya
Brihadeeswara Temple

Buddhist Monastery At Sanchi

Churches Of Goa 
Ellora Caves
Fatehpur Sikri
Humayun Tomb
Khajuraho
Mahabalipuram
Pattadkal Hampi
Sun Temple-Konark
Taj Mahal
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
India Index Page
Home >> Travel India>> India Heritage Area

Brihadeeswara Temple

This celebrated Saiva temple, appropriately called Brihadisvara and Daksinameru, is the grandest creation of the Chola emperor Rajaraja (AD 985-1012). It was inaugurated by the king himself in his 19th regnal year (AD 1009-10) and named it after himself as Rajesvara Peruvudaiyar. Architecturally, it is the most ambitious structural temple built of granite. The temple is within a spacious inner prakara of 240.90 m long (east-west) and 122m broad (north-south), with a gopura at the east and three other ordinary torana entrances one at each lateral sides and the third at rear. The prakara is surrounded by a double-storeyed malika with parivaralayas.
The sikhara, a cupolic dome, is octagonal and rests on a single block of granite, a square of 7.8 m weighing 80 tons. The majestic upapitha and adhishthana are common to all the axially placed entities like the ardhamaha and mukha-mandapas and linked to the main sanctum but approached through a north-south transept across the ardha-mandapa which is marked by lofty sopanas. The moulded plinth is extensively engraved with inscriptions by its royal builder who refers to his many endowments, pious acts and organisational events connected to the temple. The brihad-linga within the sanctum is 8.7 m high. Life-size iconographic representations on the wall niches and inner passage include Durga, Lakshmi, Sarasvati and Bhikshatana, Virabhadra Kalantaka, Natesa, Ardhanarisvara and Alingana forms of Siva. The mural paintings on the walls of the lower ambulatory inside are finest examples of Chola and later periods.

Sarfoji, a local Maratha ruler, rebuilt the Ganapati shrine. The celebrated Thanjavur school of paintings of the Nayakas are largely superimposed over the Chola murals. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Our Extended Services :

Web Design & Hosting