Home
About SAARC Tour
Send Your Tour Experience
Feedback
SAARC Tour Booking
 
Bangladesh info
Famous city of Bangladesh
Bangladesh Tours Company
Bangladesh Hotel
Bangladesh Map
Bangladesh Fairs and Festivals
Bangladesh Tour Booking
Bangladesh History
Bangladesh Religion
Culture of Bangladesh
Bangladesh Music
Bangladesh Food
Shopping in Bangladesh
Bangladesh Transportation
Bangladesh Visa
 

Bangladesh Heritage Area

Ahsan Manjil ***
Lalbag Fort***
National Museum ****
Bangabandhu Memorial
Mukti Juddha Museum
Science Museum
Shadhinota Stambha
National Poet's Graveyard
Suhrawardy Uddyan
National Leader Mausoleum
Banga-Bhaban
Parliament House
Curzon Hall
Arts & Crafts Institute
Old High Court
1857 Memorial
National Zoo
Baldha Garden
Star Mosque
Baitul Mukarram Mosque
Hindu Temples
Churches
Mosque Of Baba Adam
Sonargaon
National Martyrs Memorial
Jamuna Bridge
Tungipara
The Shrine of Hazrat ShahJalal
Sri Chaitannya Dev Temple
Shahi Eidgah
Shat Gambuj Mosque
 

Banglaesh Hillside Area

Srimongol
Madhabkunda Waterfall
Lawacherra Rain Forest
BARD Lalmai & Moinamoti
Rangamati
Khagrachari
Bandarban
Fays Lake
 
Bangladesh Seaside Area
Kuakata
Patenga & Fouzdarhat
Cox's Bazar
Himchori & Inani Beach
Moheshkhali Island
Sonadia Island
St. Martins Island
Nijhum Island
 
Bangladesh Wild side Area
Tamabil
Sundarban
Bhawal National Park
Modhupur Picnic Spot
Gajni Parjatan Center
Jaflong
 
 
 
 

 

Home >> Travel Bangladesh >> Bangladesh Heritage Area

Ahsan Manjil

Introduction
The palace has enjoyed a varied history, starting from being Rang Mahal (of Sheikh Enayetullah, a Zamindar of Jamalpur pargana (Barisal) during the time of the Mughals) to a French trading centre. Nawab Khwaja Alimullah bought it from the French in 1830 and converted it into his residence, effecting necessary reconstruction and renovations. The final reconstruction was done by Martin & Company, a European construction and engineering firm, at the behest of Nawab Khwaja Abdul Ghani, who converted this house into the official Nawabi residence.

Construction
The construction of the palace was begun in 1859 and completed in 1872. Abdul Ghani named it Ahsan Manzil after his son Nawab Khwaja Ahsanullah. The newly built palace first came to be known as the Rang Mahal. On April 7, 1888, a tornado caused severe damage to Ahsan Manzil -- Andar Mahal, the older part of the palace, was completely devastated. During the reconstruction of the Andar Mahal a good part of the palace was overhauled and repaired, and the exquisite dome of the present Rang Mahal was added. Ahsan Manzil was again damaged by an earthquake in 12 June 1897 and again repaired by the Nawab Ahsanullah.

Glory days

 

Nawab Sir Salimullah with his family in front of Ahsan Manzil

In 1874, Lord Northbrook, Governor General of India attended an evening function in the palace when he came to lay the foundation of a water works installed by Nawab Abdul Ghani. In 1888, Lord Dufferin also accepted the hospitality offered at Ahsan Manzil. In 1904 Lord Curzon, on a visit to East Bengal, stayed in this palace on 18 and 19 February to win public support for the proposed Partition of Bengal.

Almost all political activities of Nawab Khwaja Salimullah centred round this palace. Ahsan Manzil was the cradle of the All India Muslim League. With the decline of the Nawabs of Dhaka, Ahsan Manzil also started to decline.

Decline
When in 1952 the Dhaka Nawab State was acquired under the East Bengal Estate Acquisition Act, it became impossible for the successors of the Nawabs to maintain the palace due to financial constraints. Nawab Khwaja Habibullah started living at Paribag Green House soon after the acquisition of the zamindari. The palace was soon on the verge of collapse as successors rented out rooms without considering its dignity. Over the years illegal occupants turned the place into a filthy slum.

 

Renovation
Recognizing the historical and architectural importance of the Ahsan Manzil, the government of Bangladesh took the initiative to renovate it. In 1985 Ahsan Manzil and its surroundings were acquired. After the completion of the renovation work in 1992 under the supervision of the Directorate of Public Works and Architecture, it was brought under the control of Bangladesh National Museum (20 September 1992). A museum has been established there.

Description

 

Ahsan Manzil has now been converted into a museum and a popular tourist attraction of old Dhaka.

Ahsan Manzil is one of the most significant architectural monuments of Bangladesh. Established on a raised platform of 1 metre, the two-storied palace measures 125.4 m by 28.75 m. The height of the ground floor is 5 metres and that of the first floor 5.8 metres. There are porticos the height of the ground floor, both on the northern and southern sides of the palace. An open spacious stairway comes down from the southern portico, extending onto the bank of the river through the front garden. There was once a fountain in the garden in front of the stairs, that does not exist today. The spacious north and south verandas of both the floors rest on semicircular arches. The verandas and rooms are covered with marble.

To construct the dome of Ahsan Manzil, the square room on the ground floor was given a round shape with brickwork in the corners. The room was then given an octagonal shape near the roof by squinches. This octagonal shape took the form of the drum of the dome. Finally, the kumud kali (buds of lotus) shaped dome was constructed by gradually slanting the eight corners to the peak. The dome is 27.13 m above the ground.

 

Our Extended Services :

Web Design & Hosting